Reports

Short Paper/Commentary on Human Health Risk Assessment of the Energy East Project in the Red Head Community, NB

Ken Froese is an independent expert with more than 20 years experience in health and environmental risk assessment. In the report Environmental Health in Red Head: The Energy East Project Dr. Froese reviews TransCanada’s Human Health Risk Assessment, part of its Energy East project application to the National Energy Board, and reveals critical gaps in the company’s conclusions that may impact those living near the pipeline and proposed marine terminal in Red Head, New Brunswick. Amongst other things, Dr. Froese finds that the risks from benzene emissions may be understated, that worst-case scenarios were not accounted for, and that there was minimal discussion of the impact of odours from the proposed infrastructure. The report concludes with a number of important questions that can be raised with TransCanada, the National Energy Board (NEB) and the New Brunswick government about the project. 

View the report here


Energy East: An Export Pipeline, Not for Domestic Gain.

TransCanada’s proposed Energy East pipeline is not a made-in-Canada energy solution. As this analysis shows, almost all of Energy East’s crude oil would be exported. Canadian oil refineries would refine only a very small amount of Energy East’s oil. The vast majority of the oil would be shipped unrefined out of Canada.

Download "An Export Pipeline, Not for Domestic Gain"


Factsheet: Communities can say "no" to pipelines and tankers

Potential pipeline and tanker spills could be devastating to residents’ health, to local ecosystems, and to businesses and jobs dependent on clean land and water.

There are a number of precedents of communities concerned about oil pipelines passing through their borders taking action.

Download "Communities can say "no" to pipelines and tankers"


Five steps towards an Atlantic Sustainable Energy Vision

Atlantic Canadian provinces are already taking action to reduce pollution and generate good green jobs, but we need more. We can use our social ingenuity and resilience to provide energy security in a way that reduces pollution and builds a better future for all of us.

Many of our communities are coastal communities; all of our communities have strong ties to the water as well as the land. This puts Atlantic Canada on the front lines of climate change. For current and future generations, it is our responsibility to act now, and to act with conviction.

Here are five actions Atlantic Canada can take towards a sustainable energy future, with concrete examples of how we’re already on our way.

Download: Five steps towards an Atlantic Sustainable Energy Vision


Waterways Report

Drinking water, beluga habitat, and fishing and swimming holes are all at risk if TransCanada’s proposed Energy East pipeline is approved.

If approved, TransCanada’s proposed Energy East pipeline from Hardisty Alberta to export ports in Cacouna, Quebec and Saint John, New Brunswick, would be the largest oil pipeline in North America.

The sheer volume of substance proposed to be pushed through the Energy East pipeline – 1.1 million barrels per day – would mean that when the pipeline spills (and it will spill), it would seriously endanger our water sources.

Energy East: Where oil meets water provides preliminary analysis of the risks posed by Energy East to many waterways it comes near, over and under.  From Battle River, Alberta to the Bay of Fundy in New Brunswick, the report provides profiles with notable characteristics and attributes of these waterways that supply drinking water for millions of Canadians and run through the heart of cities such as Winnipeg, Ottawa and Quebec City.

Download: Energy East - Where oil meets water

 


Energy East: When the pipeline spills...

TransCanada’s Energy East pipeline project would convert an up to 40-year-old natural gas pipeline to carry crude oil from Saskatchewan to Ontario, connecting it with new pipeline through Quebec and on to Saint John, New Brunswick. It would be the largest oil pipeline

in North America, transporting 1.1 million barrels of oil every day. When it comes to pipelines, it is not a matter of if a pipeline spills, it is a matter of when, where and how much it spills.

This brief illustrates what a spill from Energy East would look like, examines leaks and explosions that have occurred on the existing pipeline, and explains how regulations have failed to protect us.

Download: Energy East - When the pipeline spills


Countering Energy East Pipeline Spin: Talking points

TransCanada Corp. is actively promoting plans for the “Energy East” pipeline that would carry up to 1.1 million barrels of oil per day, including tar sands crude, from Alberta to eastern markets. The 4,400-kilometre pipeline is expected to lead to massive tanker exports from Quebec and the Atlantic coast to send crude to the much larger and more profitable markets of the U.S., India, China and Europe. TransCanada would convert its up to 40-year-old natural gas pipeline (between Saskatchewan and Quebec), connecting it with new pipeline in the west to Empress, Alberta, and through Quebec to Saint John, New Brunswick.

Download: Countering Energy East Pipeline Spin: Talking points


Tanker Traffic and Tar Balls

What TransCanada's Energy East Pipeline Means for the Bay of Fundy and Gulf of Maine

by Matthew Abbott, Conservation Council of New Brunswick

The Conservation Council of New Brunswick has released a report on the potential impacts of TransCanada’s Energy East pipeline project on the Bay of Fundy and Gulf of Maine. The report explores the many risks to whales and other wildlife in the Bay of Fundy as well as the risk to sustainable jobs in New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Maine from increased tanker traffic and the increased risk of oil spills.

Download: Tanker Traffic and Tar Balls

Handbill: Energy East pipeline: all risk, no reward


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